Courses

For information on which courses are available during specific terms, please see the course listings found through Beartracks. Official course and program information is available though the Office of the Registrar & Student Awards.

PHYSL 500 Reproductive Physiology

The aim of this course is to describe (i) the causes of inferility, (ii) therapeutic approaches to restore on enhance fertility and (iii) contraceptive aproaches to avoid pregnancy. Lectures are the same as PHYSL 400, but with additional assignments and evealuation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit cannot be obtained for both PHYSL 400 and PHYSL 500. Prerequisites: Physiology 210 or 211 and consent of Department.

PHYSL 501 Topics in Cardiovascular Physiology

The goal of Physiology 501 is to develop critical appraisal and presentation skills in advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Through critical review of controversial topics in modern cardiovascular physiology, the participant will learn to appreciate that literature is a dynamic, changing and fallible source of information. Presentation skills are developed through both oral and written assignments and facility with the use of electronic library resources is encouraged. Course content varies from year to year. Prerequisites: PHYSL 210 or 211, PHYSL 404 and consent of Department.

PHYSL 502 Problems in Current Research

Individual study. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once.

PHYSL 506 Tutorial and Seminar Course

Guided reading course. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once.

PHYSL 513 Fetal Physiology

This course will stress experimental approaches to understanding fetal physiology as well as the development and function of the fetus from ovulation to birth and adaptation to independent life. This course also deals with maternal physiology during pregnancy, complications of pregnancy and newborn health. Prerequisites: PHYSL 210 or 211 and consent of Department. (offered in alternate years)

PHYSL 545 Physiology of Transport Systems

A consideration of transport mechanisms primarily from the physiological rather than biochemical viewpoint. Major models considered are the erythrocyte and a variety of epithelia from vertebrates. Designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Prerequisites: PHYSL 210 or 211 or ZOOL 241 or 242.  Offered in alternate years.

PHYSL 600 Colloquia in Physiology

This discussion course will provide an opportunity for Provisional PhD candidates in the Department of Physiology, prior to their candidacy examination, to research, present and critique publications in areas relevant to their research, but not their own research. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: Consent of department. Open to MSc students in the Department of Physiology.